{Multi-Racial Culture} The Ka'ar

Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
Legend
Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend

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- | - The Ka'ar: A People of the Plains- | -

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-|- Introductory Notes -|-

Location and Demographics

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Art by Laeti-Chan
The Ka'ar are a nomadic, mostly pastoralist culture who mainly live in and around the Northwestern Moorlands, just west of Blackrush. Despite being a seemingly barren wasteland to most people, the steppes provide the Ka'ar the perfect environment to practice isolation, shamanism, and general nomadism without being too hindered by the encroachment of settled peoples. Though, this might change if a community decides to venture nearer to wooded areas to hunt or gather valuable commodities. While each community is unique in some way, the Ka'ar are all united through their belief that Shalherana- or Mother Bear- is the All-God of Altera's pantheon. This belief not only shapes their nomadic way of life, but also every other aspect of their culture. This, combined with their relative isolation from other settled communities, has allowed the Ka'ar to develop a culture that is almost wholly unique compared to most Alteran cultures.

Demographically, the Ka'ar are mostly human, but also have their fair share of elves, dwarves, and caparii. Racial prejudice is almost non-existent amongst the Ka'ar, as the harsh conditions of the steppe means that every member of a community is valuable. Earthspawn, Halfspawn, and Caparii are considered to be a sort of kin, due to their closeness to the land, even if they are not nomadic.

A typical Ka'ar human usually sports a tan or peachy complexions, broader cheeks and noses, and a round face. Their eyes have often developed epicanthic folds, as it offers some protection from the sun in a fairly shadeless area. Their hair tends to be silkier, and often is brown, black, or reddish in color. Lastly, Ka'ar humans are fairly short, usually ranging from 5'4 to 5'6, though they are still a strong, sturdy people. Despite their small frame, humans in this culture are gifted with an exceptionally hardy immune system due to a slightly "dirtier" lifestyle and a diet that often includes the consumption of raw meat and vegetables. Furthermore, Ka'ar tend to be closely connected to the land, giving their senses and instincts an edge when hunting and generally handling animals, especially horses and cattle.



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Origins and the Ka'ar Socio-Political System

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Where and when the Ka'ar came about is difficult to assess, but it is likely that they are simply the result of some isolated groups settlers whose traditions and behavior changed over time. Some theorize that the Ka'ar came from Sooleran caravans who mingled with local shepherds and horse farmers. Others believe that they came about when groups of people moved from cities and towns, disillusioned with settled life. These people would eventually would have developed their own unique identity and set of traditions. Regardless of their true origins, many Ka'ar clans and tribes have their own local origin story, which is usually passed down through oral tradition by way of the Ordon- or Horde- elders and shamans. However, because many claim direct descendancy to the first Ordon, the legitimacy of these stories is difficult to assess.


While they are nomadic, the Ka'ar have formed complex systems of governance and ruling over not just each other, but any Settlers they might have conquered or allowed into their community.

The smallest unit of the Ka'ar political system is a single Ger-Family; a family that titularly lives in a single ger (a round, canvas tent). They generally live near other Ger-Families and may be a ruling class family or not. The second unit is the Clan, which is a collection of tight-nit Ger-Families, all of whom see each other as relatives. They may hold other Clans as subordinates or they may be vassals themselves. Generally, when at least four Clans are lead by one or two other Clans, they are now become an Ordon (or a Tribe, to settlers). Ordond may be lead by a collection of Clans or by one Clan, and some Ordond can have dozens of minor Clans underneath their rule. Clan and Family leadership can be matrilineal, patrilineal or neither, depending on that family's traditions. Some may have an individual acting as the sole family leader, while other Ger-Families may make decisions collectively.

The average Ka'ar can fall into a variety of four rough groups according to their family occupation; the Herdsman, the Druzhina, the Shaman, and the Erkhem. Such groups are recognized as being separate, but are not completely distinct; no one is restricted from becoming apart of one or more groups, so long as they do it well. The first group, Herdsmen, are comprised of anyone whose main occupation is that of a worker. This includes shepherds, potato or rice farmers, foragers, airag-makers, miners, lumberjacks, and any form of artisan. Herdsmen almost never lead other Clans, but they are still highly respected as the providers of the community.


The second group, Druzhina, are comprised of anyone who is a professional- usually mounted- warrior. While Druzhina can and will take up skills and occupations that fall into the Herdsman category, what differentiates them is that they have been trained from birth to fight, while Herdsmen have not. Druzhina generally serve their immediate Clan leader or the leader of the Ordon. Druzhina whose Clan leads maybe one or two clans are called Tolgoilogch (Headmen) and often serve as micromanagers to the Knyaz (the leader of an Ordon) and the rest of the Erkhem. Unlike knights, Druzhina do not inherently hold a higher status than Herdsmen, unless they are Tolgoilogch, instead, Druzhina are seen as protectors of the Herdsmen and their livelihoods.

The Shamans are the religious leaders of the Ka'ar, and can be found in almost any group of Ka'ar. They commune with the spirits of the Clan's ancestors or any spirits that roam the land they currently occupy, along with convening with Mother Bear (or what Settlers would call Shalherana) and all her avatars (the rest of the Neutral and Good Deities). Shamans have been trained at a young age to understand the land and how it affects the various duties of the community members, and with this knowledge, they will attempt to appease or at least understand the demands and personalities of the Spirits, Ancestors, and Mother Bear. Occasionally, a particularly influential Shaman can even convince an entire Ordon to pick up and move that very day!


Lastly, there are The Erkhem, who are essentially the ruling class. They consist of the Tolgoilogch, any Clans who hold vassals (the leaders of which are simply called Erkhem), and the Knyaz (or Knyazhna if they are female); the leader of an Ordon. Anyone can become a part of the Erkhem, though the method varies from community to community. A particularly loyal family might be promoted by their local leader, but they could also be elected or even gain their title through sheer force. Whoever they might be, the Erkhem must lead their various communities to prosperous lands, respect the advice of the Shamans, and generally show wisdom, strength, and honor as leaders.
 

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Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
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- | - The Ka'ar Lifestyle - | -

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The Occupations and Importance of the Herdsman Class

Most Ka'ar live a pastoralist or otherwise agriculturalist lifestyle, and as such, most Ka'ar are of the Herdsmen status. While the Ka'ar are known mostly as horse breeders and horse tamers, other herding professions including goatherding, shepherding, reindeer-herding, and cattle-rustling. These Herdsmen are knowledgeable in not only the raising of these animals, but also know how to use every part of their animals; from the wool and meat to the bones and skins. Community members who do not deal in raising herd animals supplement the community by utilizing the raw materials or by taking up some other trade, such as hunting, fishing, or farming. Such duties might even rotate throughout the year, depending on how property is distributed amongst the clan or tribe. As such, specialization in the overall Ka'ar economy is low, as almost every Ka'ar knows how to do what everyone else can do. Once someone in the community learns how to say, work bronze, it is their job to teach everyone, just in case they are away. There are exceptions in the case of high-quality craftsmen, like jewelers, weaponsmiths, armorers, teamakers, and brewers. Further, if your class allows you to control other Ka'ar, you might allocate some of your duties or herds to the rest of your community through some sort of agreement; perhaps a Druzhina allows every fifth lamb to be given to the people who shepherd his personal flocks.

While (nomadic) pastoralism is practically cosmopolitan amongst the Ka'ar, full-time farmers do exist. If the territory a community lives in is stable enough, the less-movement inclined members of that community might become farmers. Generally, the windswept plains of the west do not allow for many crops, so potatoes and root-vegetables are most common. However, if a Ka'ar clan finds themselves in possession of a warmer, more temperate land, a farmer might find himself growing rice, ginger, onions, and other crops. Such crops are in high-demand, so an enterprising farmer will generally try to grow as much as they can before their community returns to collect the harvest. There is a catch, however, as farmers are generally thought to be taxing on the land that Mother Bear provided to them. Because of this, more conservative Ka'ar find farmers to be an unnecessary distraction and temptation in life.

Generally, trade agreements are made through the Herdsmen class, and are generally done via bartering. If two Erkhem agree to trade, for example, six herds of goats for twelve flocks of geese, the Herdsmen are told to collect these animals from either their Knyaz's personal herds, or from their own herds. They will then transport said animals to the respective recipient and return home. It is seen as sacrilegious if someone "steals" their labor in any exchange, be it as a polity or between friends. If a community does not have the materials or animals at hand immediately, Herdsmen will instead deliver bone tablets depicting a certain amount of that good or that animal as an IOU. These bone tablets are cracked and discarded or marked as "Used."

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A crude bone-tablet honoring an agreement between two or more parties, in which someone will receive four maral deer.

Warriors and Warfare

Top to bottom, left to right; A Herdsmen acting as light cavalry, a lightly armored, mounted Druzhina, a Foot Druzhina, and a Mounted, Heavy Druzhina.
The Ka'ar do not always get along with each other for a variety of reasons; resources can be scarce and populations too close together, or vice versa, personal squabbles can spiral out of control, or shamans can get into arguments with each other. Warfare tends to be on a smaller scale compared to the warfare of settled individuals, though clashes between Ordond almost always end in a large, full-scale battle or even raids of the "main" settlement of an opponent. Generally, once an Erkhem is under the control of an Ordon, in-fighting is intensely discouraged and heavily policed by the Ordon's enforcers, though raids against external enemies- be they Ka'ar or Settlers- may be allowed, depending on the circumstances.
When war does strike, though, all the members of a community become involved, regardless of age, gender, or class. Herdsmen generally carry on with their daily tasks, but with the added work of supplying their fighting force with whatever food and materials they might need. Herdsmen also take on rolls as Bambarchin, meaning "torchbearers", and are responsible for burning enemy settlements, looting the dead, robbing other Herdsmen, and raiding cattle. Other duties of the Bambarchin involve creating siegeworks in the event that the enemy has created some set of fortifications, or even espionage. Meanwhile, shamans tend to remain unarmed, and assist their Erkhem by acting as diviners and as mouthpieces for their ancestors, whom may have good strategic or tactical advice for their descendants.
Yet amongst all the Classes, none are so more obviously important in Ka'ar warfare than the Druzhina class. Without the Druzhina, Herdsmen live in fear of marauders, Shaman have no one to give counsel to, and Erkhem have no one to send to settle disputes. Indeed, Druzhina are one of the most powerful cornerstones in Ka'ar societies, so much so that even peaceable communities will have at least one capable individual to help protect them. Druzhina are the only professional fighters in Ka'ar culture, so as a result, members of this class are expected to know how to conduct themselves in almost every combat situation and to do so in an honorable fashion. It is not just enough to know how to ride and shoot a bow, or toss a javelin, or how to brace one's lance or glaive on the back of a horse, but they must also know when it is appropriate to praise and insult their foe. Such "honor" will be covered later (See: Etiquette.)
Honor aside, Druzhina are expected to be experts in the Four Weapons before anything; the Bow, the Two-Handed Axe, the Sword, and the Lasso. Archery, specifically, horse-archery is an art form for the Ka'ar, who have learned to loose their arrows from the back of their horse and as soon as all four hooves have left the ground in each gallop. It is said that a masterful Ka'ar horse-archer can loose at least six arrows from their quiver in the span of ten seconds; a feat that becom109301es much harder when one realizes that a warrior's recurve bow has a draw-weight of at least 170+ pounds.
The second weapon, the Two-Handed Axe or Sükh, which can actually be defined as any weapon requiring the use of both hands, but mainly means two-handed scimitars, dane axes, bardiches, glaives, and halberds. Such weapons are generally used on foot, of course, but as the Ka'ar are a deeply equestrian folk, it is also expected that a good warrior can utilize such weapons on horseback. Two-handed weapons are the preferred choice when warriors take part in ritualized combat, such as Honor Duels and Champion-to-Champion Combat.
The third weapon is the Sword or Selem, which- unlike in many Settled cultures- the Ka'ar do not see as a status item, meaning that anyone can carry a sword, regardless of their part of the caste system. Ka'ar prefer scimitars and sabers when on horseback, but also use straight, short swords as secondary melee weapons when on foot.
The fourth and final weapon is the Lasso, is used less as a lethal weapon more than it is as a way of humiliating and terrifying one's enemies. The Ka'ar lasso can double as a whip for their horses (though it is not used to actually sting the horses more than to tap them), but also as a way to lash out at opponents, ensnare them, and drag them across the muddy plains. Crueler warriors may use a war-lasso, which is a lasso with sharp barbs attached to the entirety of the rope.
Only when one has mastered these four weapons can they then be considered a full Druzhina, until then, they will remain a Dagaldgach, or an apprentice. Dagaldgach are not allowed to real combat until they are ready, and instead are relegated to taking squire-like duties to the Druzhina they are assigned to. Other weapons a warrior may be seen using include the sagaris axe, war hammers, horseman's picks, maces, lances, javelins, and even their own horses, which can be trained to bite and trample and some warriors even bard their horses with spikes to prevent infantry from getting too close!
In terms of armor, many Herdsmen go to battle in tough, rawhide lamellar or in thick, fur-lined gambesons, while the Druzhina can be found in steel or bronze lamellar, brigandine, mail, or plated-mail. Materials available to Druzhina include rawhide, wrought iron, bronze, and steel, depending on their community's wealth, with steel being the most extravagant material and rawhide being the cheapest. Helmets vary from full-face lamellar helmets, lamenellenhelms, open-faced, lamellar bascinets, or spangenhelms, all of which might be lavishly decorated with colorful strips of cloth, bronze and bone bangles, and even functional, fearsome, warmasks.

- | - Mythology and Religion of the Ka'ar - | -









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-|- Ka'ar Creation Myth -|-




While the religious beliefs of the Ka'ar are not uniform across every community, the basic tenants are essentially the same. Firstly, the Ka'ar do not believe that the Pantheon is composed of separate gods and goddesses. Rather, they believe that in creating the world, the Mother Bear (Shalherana) created various avatars out of the different facets of Her personality in order to more easily carry out Her Will and guide all mortals. After plants, animals, and mortals were created, Mother Bear gave life to the rivers and rocks. Meanwhile, Ignis gave life to the fires and storms of the world, as well as molding her Brother, the Sun, out of a burning ball of beeswax and yak tallow, and Sister Moon out of a ball of ice with a candle in it, and finally, the Eternal Sky out of a sheet of the silk of a giant goat, known as Ichilai. The Eternal Sky (which some now conceptualize as the Makani god Manna, in light of the arrival of the Makani) then watched over the world and told Mother Bear what beauty there was. Hearing of this beauty enraged the envious Crusade (now Valiant) who then lit the heart of every being on fire, giving all beings an unquenchable rage. Mother Bear tempered this anger by creating Sallana, who imbued the world with the ability to love, and then the world began to crowd, she created the Grey Lady (Mother Death) so that plants, animals, and mortals would suffer the consequences of eternal life with all of its strife. To further enrich and temper life, Mother Bear created Rahas (Uncle Temperance) to help arbitrate disputes between life, and Silas (The Great Owl) who gave mortals and animals alike the trait of curiosity, so that existence would be more than just base desires. As for the evil gods, the Ka'ar believe that they were created when Mother Bear- in a state of depressed rage- accidentally cried into a puddle of oil, which splashed onto the other Gods and caused Visage to be born from Uncle Temperance, Skraag from Mother Death, and Jishrim from Sallana. These beings were furious that they were created on accident and when they were mocked for their hideous appearance, they all vowed to taint the land wherever they went.
With the world and Her avatars created, Mother Bear went about finding the most virtuous of mortals and teaching them how to thrive in accordance with Her Will, which would help them attain happiness in this life and the next. Yet, when she began her search, she did not know who to look for, and so she instead watched the world for many generations, disguising herself as various animals and travellers to ask questions. These questions and conversations have been immortalized in many Ka'ar Long-Songs, in which shamans take the roles of Mother Bear and the people, plants, animals, and natural features she queries. She discovered that those who travelled much and gave back to the earth were often the happiest, as were those who followed a code of Honor and Integrity. Mother Bear then gathered these people and told them all she could about good living, and when she was done, she called them "Ka'ar", meaning "Proper Ones." Thus, to this day, the phrase "it is not Ka'ar" is used to express disapproval about a particular behavior or practice.


-|- Shamanic Rituals -|-




Shamans do not have a uniform set of rituals between various tribes, clans, or even within local communities. As such, it is difficult to describe every practice, ritual, or holiday amongst the shaman caste. That being said, there are often many similarities in ritual practices across Ka'ar communities, such as their usage of drums, mantras, sensory deprivation, and throat-singing. Many rituals are centered around mundane events like harvests, the births of animals and people, the passings of seasons, and mourning the dead. Unlike many Settled cultures, shamans or medicinemen generally make no distinction between themselves and laypeople, as anyone can become a shaman with enough training. Further, shamans do not go through formal seminary schools like priests or other Settled clergy; many Ka'ar might be shamans just on their own spare time! Instead, apprentice shamans generally form their own practices by combining their experiences with the traditions and lessons of older shamans. This means that rituals are less based on theological doctrine and more on what the local community believes to be true.
With this in mind, it should be noted that the usage of hallucinogenic or oneirogenic substances is a controversial matter amongst the shaman class. Some shamans rely on fasting, ecstatic dancing, mantras, and general meditation to reach a vision-state, maintaining that the usage of things like psilocybin mushrooms, marijuana, and alcohol create less discipline in one's mind, meaning that the resulting visions are less accurate to the outside world and instead reflect one's inner psyche. Regardless, psychedelic substances that are used include psilocybin mushrooms and fly agaric mushrooms, both of which are eaten. Alcohol such as vodka and inhalants such as cannabis and opium are also used more rarely. Other times, shamans will induce hallucinations by breathing in smoke from sacred fires, although these are caused by oxygen-deprivation and not necessarily by any property of the smoke itself.
Other common ritual practices include:
- The spreading of milk, alcohol, or soup into the air as a libation to the Gods or to local spirits.
- The imitation of animals to increase the chances of a good hunt or cattle-migration.
- The imitation of warriors in battle to guarantee victory in battle.
- Blessing newly born animals and people and the gers that they live in by calling on their ancestors to speak their wisdom to them.
- Bone-casting or bone-readings, in which shamans toss bones into a fire and read the cracks to predict the future or simply tell someone's fortunes.
- Creating Ovoos; shrines made of stacked rocks. These are created by circling a particular area and throwing rocks into a pile until they are as tall as possible. Blessings on the land, spirits, animals, and people in the form of mantras are often spoken while these ovoos are constructed. These structures act as "homes" for the ancestors of the community who travel with them in death. When one passes by an ovoo, they are supposed to offer a libation or pass around three times, which is supposed to awaken the spirit, who will protect you on your journey.


-|- Nomadism and "Settlers" -|-





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The Ka'ar practice of nomadism goes beyond simple necessity and into the realm of doctrinal beliefs. Such beliefs might vary slightly between tribes, but ultimately they revolve around two main ideas. First, there is the belief that the natural world does not recognize the superiority of any form of life, as every being plays a necessary role in keeping Altera in a state of constant balance. For example, a bear who slays a man is simply playing its role in the world with just as much impunity as a man who slays a bear. Further, to take revenge on that bear would not disrupt the balance so long if it is within reason. Lastly, it is thought that settled life is a product of mortalkind's higher intelligence, but also of their greed. Their ability to sense what role they need to play in maintaining the world's vitality can be lost if they are separated from their roots. Settled life puts a barrier from mortals to the rest of world, and because they do not wish to leave the confines of their cities or towns, they never come to understand their roles, and instead, continue to grow like a cancer as they sap the lands of their resources without ever giving back. Trees that are cut down are not replanted, water that is taken in returned contaminated with slag and toxins, and those who die try to keep their bodies preserved forever. Some semblance of balance might be present, as Mother Bear will always have her due, but due to the cunning of mortalkind, it is more difficult for her to restore order in settled lands.
This distrust of "Settlers" (meaning, settled people, they are also called "Stone People" for their propensity to live in stone structures), while not universal amongst all Ka'ar, could easily cause conflict between local clans and Settlers. While many Ka'ar might simply try and isolate themselves, other clans might seek to "cleanse" their stomping grounds of Settlers. This might mean destroying dams, collapsing mines, stealing cattle, burning fields, and of course, outright warfare or even genocide. However, other Ka'ar might be more open-minded, recognizing that Settlers produce goods, ideas, and people that could be of use to them. Usually, these Ka'ar will attempt to live in peace with them and participate in simple trades. For example, if a Shaman cannot heal a sick person, tribes might ask a Settler doctor for their assistance in exchange for some other service or good. Such trades almost never use money, as many Ka'ar either believe it to be worthless (it cannot be made into tools or symbolic jewelry), or because they do not understand how it works. The latter explanation is a bit rarer amongst those in closer proximity to Settled peoples, but the general confusion stems from the fact that many Ka'ar prefer bartering with goods that are more immediately or clearly useful than something that can be saved up. Cattle might be useful one day in a trade, and then worthless on another day, so many Ka'ar are can't figure out why it isn't the same with currency. Combined with a distrust of Settled culture, currency is almost exclusively used when dealing with Settled people. This isn't to say that precious metals are considered worthless by the Ka'ar, however, as smiths often melt down spare coins into jewelry and other artworks.
 
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Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
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Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend
- | - The Physical Culture of the Ka'ar - | -



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Clothing and Fashion Styles

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A woman of the Erkhem class wearing a deel, art by phobs

Ka'ar clothing is fairly practical, but not necessarily without aesthetic beauty or flair. Living in colder climates means that many tribespeople sport fur or woolen kaftans, called deels, which are dyed simply or not at all. Other forms of clothing include greatcoats, woolen robes, and quilted vests, all of which are made so that riding around on a horse in them is a comfortable affair. In formal situations, such as clan gatherings, weddings, and audiences with Erkhem, Ka'ar of either sex will wear deels made of fine linen, cotton, or silk, all of which are more lavishly dyed to match their clan colors. These deels will also be tightened by a silk or wool belt with gold or bronze inlays to mark one's status as an Erkhem. Most forms of clothing are unisex, but within the Erkhem class, women who are less invested in physical work might wear elaborate hair-dos and silk, envelope-style dresses.

In warmer climates, tribespeople might wear looser variations of the deel where there might be less clasps or perhaps one devoid of a belt. Regardless of climate, however, baring one's chests and legs in any time beyond wrestling is unheard of and completely unacceptable. Even activities such as bathing and swimming are done with clothing on. Footwear usually comes in the form of short leather, rawhide, or linen boots with curved tips that prevent them from tripping in their deels or getting their feet caught in their stirrups. Some are lavishly decorated with colored patterns and beads to match their horse's kit, while others are quite simple and utilitarian.


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An Erkhem's Headdress, art by Phobs
While in most cultures it is impolite or unusual to attend casual situations wearing armor, amongst the Ka'ar, it is fairly normal and usually encouraged if one is a warrior. Druzhina often will mark their status as warriors by displaying a richly decorated side-arm or perhaps accompanying their usual clothing with cuirasses of rawhide lamellar. As a warrior, to be without one's armor or a sidearm is to show a neglect for one's duties, and so many Druzhina would not be caught dead at a social function without at least some sort of weapon or armor on their person. They also tend to shave their heads, leaving only enough hair for a wolftail or a few braids, which are decorated with bronze rings or gemstone jewelry. Further, Erkhem who oversee Ordond do not wear crowns or circlets (which anyone can across the caste wear), rather, they wear long, cloth headdresses with horse-hair braids, furs, eagle feathers, and jewelry carved into their Clan Sigil.


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Music and Singing






Claim! This spot will be reserved for a section revolving around the aesthetic culture of Ka'ar fashion styles, music, cuisine, recreation and etiquette!
 
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Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
Legend
Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend
Claim! Other than a quick guide on their playstyle, I'm not sure what I'll include here, but if you have any suggestions, please let me know! You can post now, if you want, but I'm not sure if there's anything to comment on quite yet.

Special thanks to Galaxy Ellievator Mudpaw11 and Bartooliinii for giving me the encouragement I need to keep up with this project :)

OH! And to NIAH for letting me use her cultural map idea!!
 
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Fronslin

Lord of Altera
Good
Crafter
Fronslin
Fronslin
Good
Thoughts on magic would be sort of... Scattered as well based on tribes?
Or is there a pattern?
 

Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
Legend
Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend
Thoughts on magic would be sort of... Scattered as well based on tribes?
Or is there a pattern?
I hadn’t thought of that! I assume their thoughts on it might range from them being fine with it to being afraid of it. I’m sure there could be an especially isolated community that hasn’t even heard of magic, somehow!
 

blargtheawesome

... is very scientifical.
Staff member
106166

hey, so this sort of area has regions/existing cultures in it. could you not make decisions about what sort of other cultures/peoples exist in the area w/o consulting the existing people here?
 

Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
Legend
Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend
View attachment 106166

hey, so this sort of area has regions/existing cultures in it. could you not make decisions about what sort of other cultures/peoples exist in the area w/o consulting the existing people here?
Yeah, sure thing. I can edit the PNG so that it excludes certain areas. I'll start asking various region owners if they don't mind having the culture nearish/adjacent to them.

That was my bad, I'll be speaking to as many region owners as possible in the areas I think it might affect. Obviously if they don't want them there, that's fine!
 
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Blorbis83

Lord of Altera
Legend
Blorbis83
Blorbis83
Legend
Finished the section on Herdsmen and warfare, finalized some spelling as well (I spelt Ordon wrong). I am, however, still working on religion and mythology! After that comes an explanation on Settlers, and then some more of the nitty-gritty stuff like food, clothing and manners :) People are welcome to play as a Ka'ar, just let me know, since the culture isn't finished and it would be nice to have some new ideas from people other than myself.
 
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Rygan

Deathblade
Staff member
Rygan_Deathblade
Rygan_Deathblade
Just wanted to commend you on swift compliance and adapting of an already started work to fit the new cultural rules.
 
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